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College of Education Faculty Book Roundup

College of Education faculty have been busy publishing their research and ideas. Check out these recently published books authored and edited by some of our faculty:

Kathleen Budge, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies, and Bill Parrett, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies 

Budge, K. & Parrett, W.H. (2018). Disrupting poverty: Five powerful classroom practices. ASCD: Alexandria, VA. 

Kathleen M. Budge and William H. Parrett dispel harmful myths, explain the facts, and urge educators to act against the debilitating effects of poverty on their students. They share the powerful voices of teachers—many of whom grew up in poverty—to amplify the five classroom practices that permeate the culture of successful high-poverty schools: (1) caring relationships and advocacy, (2) high expectations and support, (3) commitment to equity, (4) professional accountability for learning, and (5) the courage and will to act. Readers will explore classroom-tested strategies and practices, plus online templates and exercises that can be used for personal reflection or ongoing collaboration with colleagues. Disrupting Poverty provides teachers, administrators, coaches, and others with the background information and the practical tools needed to help students break free from the cycle of poverty.

Patrick Lowenthal, Department of Educational Technology 

Davidson-Shivers, G. V., Rasmussen, K. L., & Lowenthal, P. R. (2018). Web-based learning: Design, implementation, and evaluation. New York, NY: Springer.

This second edition is a practical, easy-to-read resource on web-based learning. The book ably and clearly equips readers with strategies for designing effective online courses, creating communities of web-based learners, and implementing and evaluating based on an instructional design framework. Case examples, case studies, and discussion questions extend readers skills, inspire discussion, and encourage readers to explore the trends and issues related to online instructional design and delivery.

Phil Kelly, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies, and Kerry Rice, Department of Educational Technology 

Rice, K. L., Siemieniecki, D., Siemieniecka, B., & Kelly, P. P. (2017). Crossing borders: An Exploration of educational technology in the U. S. and Poland. Nicolaus Copernicus University.

The evolution and praxis of U.S. and Polish educational systems are juxtaposed in a discussion of technology-supported learning in the context of historic determinants, educational policy, and past and emerging practice. Both the research presented and examples of student works and projects help answer questions about the shape of future technology supported educational systems, frame the challenges education is facing, and present perspectives for future development.

Carl Siebert, Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies

Siebert, C. F., & Siebert, D. C. (2017). Data analysis with small samples and non-normal data:  Nonparametrics and other strategies. Oxford University Press.

In social sciences, education, and public health research, researchers often conduct small pilot studies (or may have planned for a larger sample but lost too many cases due to attrition or missingness), leaving them with a smaller sample than they expected and thus less power for their statistical analyses. Similarly, researchers may find that their data are not normally distributed — especially in clinical samples — or that the data may not meet other assumptions required for parametric analyses. In these situations, nonparametric analytic strategies can be especially useful, though they are likely unfamiliar. A clearly written reference book, Data Analysis with Small Samples and Non-Normal Data offers step-by-step instructions for each analytic technique in these situations.

Arturo Rodriguez, Department of Literacy, Language, and Culture

Rodriguez, A. (2017). Imagining education: Beyond the logic of global neoliberal capitalism. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Given the current social climate this book interrogates capitalism’s relationships to and influence on education. More importantly, this book is part of a greater effort to re‐humanize society by generating dialogue, encouraging solidarity and providing analyses of power and avenues for agency in supporting a life beyond the logic of the state and its implied structure, global neoliberal capitalism. The authors speak to the conceptual and material manifestations of neoliberalism that order education.

Youngkyun Baek, Department of Educational Technology

Baek, Y. (2017). Game-based learning: Theory, strategies and performance outcomes. New York: Nova Science.

At a time when digital games are becoming much more commonly used in classrooms, this book provides a much-needed guide to different forms and applications of digital game-based learning. The book brings together researchers and practitioners from around the world who share their theories, strategies, findings of case studies, and practical approaches to support better performance and learning outcomes when learning with digital games.

Norm Friesen, Department of Educational Technology

Friesen, N. (2017). The Textbook and the Lecture: Education in the Age of new Media. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press

Why are the fundamentals of education apparently so little changed in our era of digital technology? Is their obstinate persistence evidence of resilience or obsolescence? Such questions can best be answered not by imagining an uncertain high-tech future, but by examining a well-documented past—a history of instruction and media that extends from Gilgamesh to Google. Norm Friesen looks to the combination and reconfiguration of oral, textual, and more recent media forms to understand the longevity of so many educational arrangements and practices.

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 2018 Teacher Education Candidates Share Inquiry Findings


Boise State intern teacher candidates presented inquiry research findings at the Fall 2018 Inquiry Fair on November 26 at the Student Union Building.

Almost 80 teacher education students studying in elementary and secondary teacher preparation programs presented their findings at the two-hour event.

Examples of presentation titles include:

  • Learning Preferences and Interactions, Gabrielle Sturge
  • Teacher Rapport with English Language Learners, Gena Case
  • Mindfulness and Student Behavior, Jaraka Ball
  • Critical Thinking and Self-Efficacy, Robert Wilcox

 

 

Teacher Candidates Learn about Professional Year Placements


Over 30 elementary and secondary teacher candidates attended an information session on November 7th in the Imagination Lab about the professional year placement process. The professional year is the final year for teacher education students, and includes the intern and student teaching semesters.

The information session included a discussion led by teacher education faculty, and other activities to support teacher candidates make the most of their professional year experience.

Boise State Teacher Candidates Prepare for Employment

Boise State teacher candidates participated in practice interviews with local school administrators at the Student Union Building on November 5th. The seminar provided candidates with real-world interview experience and advice from future employers.

Teacher candidates on track to graduate December 15th received advice from future employers about the application, hiring and interviewing processes. The candidates provided administrators with their prepared education resumes, and engaged in multiple rounds of group interviews with principals and district officials.

Boise State’s teacher education programs thank the Teacher Education Ambassadors student organization, and the following building administrators and district personnel for volunteering their time to support our teacher education candidates:

Administrator Panel

  • Jeff Roberts, Principal, North Junior High, Boise School District
  • Gale Zickefoose, Principal, Shadow Hills Elementary, Boise School District
  • Shelly Wray Math Supervisor, Boise School District
  • Tim Lowe, Principal, Taft Elementary, Boise School District
  • Anita Wilson, Principal, Caldwell High School, Caldwell School District
  • Lyle Bayley, Superintendent, Castleford School District
  • Micah Doramus, Head of School, Forge International Charter School
  • Stefanie Duby, Principal, West Middle School, Nampa School District
  • Steve Labau, Principal, Lake Ridge Elementary, Nampa School District
  • Rick Jordan, Vice Principal, Skyview High School, Nampa School District
  • Matt Crist, Principal, East Valley Middle School, Nampa School District
  • Ramona Lee, Special Education Director, West Ada School District
  • Jamie Dobson, Principal, Eliza Hart Spalding STEM Academy, West Ada School District
  • Mike Hirano, Principal, Rocky Mountain High School, West Ada School District
  • Debbie Aholt, Instructional Coach, Meridian Elementary, West Ada School District

 

Intern Teachers Attend Linguistic Diversity Seminar

Boise State intern teachers attended a language acquisition seminar focused on supporting linguistic diversity on Monday at the SUB.

Led by Boise State faculty, the teacher candidates discussed how to effectively plan for linguistic diversity, academic language support, and EL instruction. They also practiced using the lens of equity to differentiate instructional design.

Intern teachers are typically in their first semester of their professional year, and complete a minimum of 380 hours in the classroom. Combined with the student teaching semester, professional year teacher candidates complete a minimum of 1,000 hours in the classroom over the course of the final program year.

Boise State Teacher Education Students Attend Inquiry Seminar

Around 80 elementary and secondary Boise State teacher education students attended an inquiry scaffolding seminar on August 27 at the Student Union Building. Led by teacher education faculty, the teacher candidates engaged in inquiry-based thinking and practice activities.

During their intern teaching semester, teacher candidates will investigate a line of inquiry and present their findings at the upcoming Inquiry Roundtable on November 26th from 3:30-5:30pm in the SUB Lookout Room. The Inquiry Roundtable will be open to all students interested in teacher education.

Teacher Education Graduation Celebration Class of 2018

Spring 2018 Teacher Education Graduate Celebration, Alumni Center

The College of Education, Boise State Alumni Association, and the K-12 Professional Development Program teamed up May 2nd to host a celebration honoring the teacher education graduating class of 2018. Professors and administrators from the College of Education attended as mentors and supporters, reminisced with students about their time in the program, and gave advice to graduates as they took the next step into their future as teachers in the classroom.

The celebration recognized the camaraderie that is built among teacher education students, and the continued support offered by Boise State as students become teaching professionals. Jennifer Weddel, Program Manager for the K-12 Professional Development Program says, “The K-12 Teacher Professional development department feels strongly that we are here to support teachers as they venture into the profession not only through meaningful professional development, but through a community. Students may be leaving Boise State upon graduation, but we are never leaving them.”

 

Boise State Teacher Candidates Prepare for Employment after Graduation

Spring 2018 Mock Interviews with Administrator Panel

Boise State teacher candidates participated in practice interviews with local school administrators at the Student Union Building on April 2nd. The seminar provided candidates with real-world interview experience and advice from future employers.

Teacher candidates on track to graduate next month received advice from future employers about the application, hiring and interviewing processes. The candidates provided administrators with their prepared education resumes, and engaged in multiple rounds of group interviews with principals and district officials.

Boise State’s teacher education programs thank the following building administrators and district personnel for volunteering their time to support our teacher education candidates:

Administrator Panel

  • Gale Zickefoose, Shadow Hills Elementary, Boise School District
    Chris Taylor, Boise School District
    Teri Thaemert, Boise School District
    Tim Lowe, Taft Elementary, Boise School District
  • Lyle Bayley, Castleford School District
  • Micah Doramus, Sage International, Charter
  • Jennifer Monserat, Silver Trail Elementary, Kuna School District
  • Matt Crist, East Valley Middle School, Nampa School District
    Diana Molino, Nampa High School, Nampa School District
    Stefanie Duby, West Middle School, Nampa School District
  • Bob Gwyn, Ridgevue High School, Vallivue School District
  • Jen Logan, Lake Hazel Elementary, West Ada School District
    Mike Hirano, Rocky Mountain High School, West Ada School District
    Bret Heller, Victory Middle School, West Ada School District
    Jennifer Fletcher, West Ada School District

Celebrating 25 Years of Doctoral Study in the College of Education

The College of Education doctoral program celebrated its 25th anniversary April 3rd. The event featured faculty and alumni from 1993-2018 who represented both the doctoral program in curriculum and instruction, and the college’s newest doctoral program in educational technology.
The doctoral program at Boise State was created in 1993 to fill a need for educators looking to advance their studies in the Treasure Valley. Graduates of the doctoral program have become leaders in public education and school improvement, and bring their advanced expertise in education to work as school principals, university professors, as well as private businesses and organizations.

Past students remembered how the program brought them together with like-minded and committed fellow educators with whom they built friendships and support throughout their time in the program. “The people in the doctoral program are what I remember most,” said Laurie Wolfe ‘05, Chief Academic Officer, Gem Innovation Schools. “My favorite part of the doctoral program was reading and having a group of educators with a wide range of experiences to discuss current education topics with. Everyone brought their own expertise and perspectives to the program and it made the experience much richer.”

The Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction was the first doctoral degree program at Boise State University. As of Spring 2018, the College of Education has conferred doctoral degrees to 139 students.

Student Teachers Engage in Planning, Assessment and Reflection Seminar

Boise State Teacher Education Spring 2018 S-PAT

Boise State student teachers attended a seminar on the Standard Performance Assessment for Teachers (S-PAT) at the Student Union Building on February 5. The teacher candidates engaged in skill-specific sessions to deepen understanding and engagement with the S-PAT process. Boise State teacher education faculty and liaisons held small group sessions on planning, assessment, and reflection activities related to instructional practice.

Boise State Teacher Education Spring 2018 S-PAT

Student teachers complete the S-PAT as a part of the required activities during the professional year. The S-PAT is the culminating assessment of a teacher candidate’s learning and performance.

Click here to learn more about Teacher Education at Boise State.

 

 

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