Mobile Menu

Publications

Doumas, D. M. (in press). Web-based personalized feedback: Is this an appropriate approach for reducing drinking among high school students? Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment.

Abstract: Research indicates brief web-based personalized feedback interventions are effective in reducing alcohol use and the negative associated consequences among college students.  It is not clear, however, that this is an appropriate strategy for high school students.  This study examined high school students’ perceptions of a brief web-based personalized feedback program to assess the appropriateness of this approach for this age group.  Results indicated that the majority of students found the program to be user-friendly and to have high utility.  Additionally, students reporting alcohol use found the program more useful and indicated they would be more likely to recommend the program to other students relative to non-drinkers.  Findings support the appropriateness of this approach for high school students, and suggest web-based personalized feedback may be more positively perceived by students who have initiated drinking.

Doumas, D. M. (in press). Alcohol use among sanctioned and non-sanctioned first year students: The role of drinking motives. Journal of College Counseling.

Abstract: This study examined differences in the relationship of drinking motives to drinking behavior among sanctioned and non-sanctioned first year students (N = 298).  Results of hierarchical regression analyses indicated for both sanctioned and non-sanctioned students, alcohol use was predicted by social and enhancement motives and alcohol-related consequences were predicted by social, enhancement, and coping motives. Additionally, high levels of conformity motives predicted alcohol use and alcohol-related consequences for sanctioned students only. Counseling implications are discussed.

Doumas, D. M., Hausheer, R., & Esp, S. (in press). Age of drinking initiation as a moderator of the efficacy of a brief, web-based personalized feedback alcohol intervention. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse.

Abstract: Early initiation of alcohol use is associated with high-risk drinking and an increased risk of adult alcohol dependence. The current study tested age of drinking initiation as a moderator of the efficacy of a brief, web-based intervention on frequency of drinking and alcohol-related consequences among 9th grade students (N = 513).  At a 3-month follow-up, students in the intervention group reported a reduction in drinking frequency and alcohol-related consequences relative to those in the control group.  Additionally, age of drinking initiation was a significant moderator of intervention efficacy. Intervention effects were greatest among two groups of students – those who reported abstinence at baseline and those who initiated drinking at age 11 or younger.  Results support a brief, web-based intervention as a promising strategy for reducing frequency of drinking and the associated consequences as a prevention strategy for students who report no drinking history and as an intervention strategy for early initiators who are at the highest risk for developing alcohol-related problems.

Doumas, D. M., & Midgett, A. (in press).  Ethnic differences in drinking motives and alcohol use among collegiate athletes. Journal of College Counseling.

Doumas, D. M., Hausheer, R., Esp, S., & Cuffee, C. (2014). Reducing alcohol use among 9th grade students: 6 month outcomes of a brief, web-based intervention. Journal of  Substance Abuse Treatment, 47, 102-105.

Abstract: This study tested a brief, web-based personalized feedback program aimed at reducing alcohol use and alcohol-related consequences among 9th grade students (N = 513).  Results indicated no differences between the control group and intervention group on either frequency of drinking or alcohol-related consequences at the 6-month follow-up.  Reductions in alcohol use and the associated consequences found at the 3-month follow-up were not sustained across the academic year.  Results indicate brief, web-based feedback programs may not be sufficient to provide a sustained impact on alcohol use and alcohol-related consequences over time, suggesting either booster sessions or adjunctive interventions, such as parent-based interventions, may be warranted for this age group.

Doumas, D. M., Esp, S., Turrisi, R., Hausheer, R., & Cuffee, C. (2014). A test of the efficacy of a brief, web-based personalized feedback intervention to reduce drinking among 9th grade students. Addictive Behaviors.

Abstract:  Alcohol use increases substantially during the transition from middle school to high school.  This study tested a brief, web-based personalized feedback program aimed at reducing risk factors for drinking, alcohol use, and alcohol-related consequences among 9th grade students.  At a 3-month follow-up, students in the intervention group showed positive results relative to those in the control group on variables associated with reduced risk, including positive alcohol expectancies and positive beliefs about alcohol.  Students in the intervention group also reported a reduction in drinking frequency and alcohol-related consequences relative to those in the control group.  There were, however, no differences in normative beliefs regarding peer drinking or quantity of weekly drinking between the two groups.  Results indicate a brief, web-based personalized normative feedback program delivered in the school setting is a promising approach to reducing alcohol use and the associated consequences among 9th grade students.


Doumas, D. M., Hausheer, R., & Esp, S. (in press). Heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related consequences: Sex-specific differences in parental influences among 9th grade students. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse.

 Abstract:  Parents impact adolescent substance abuse, but sex-specific influences are not well-understood. This study examined parental influences on adolescent drinking behavior in a sample of 9th grade students (N = 473).  Hierarchical regression analyses indicated parental monitoring, disapproval of teen alcohol use, and quality of parent-teen general communication were significant predictors of drinking behaviors.  Sex, however, moderated these relationships.  Specifically, parental monitoring was protective of heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related consequences for females, whereas parental disapproval of teen alcohol was protective of heavy episodic drinking for males.  Implications for sex-specific parent-based intervention programs are discussed.


Doumas, D. M., & Hutz-Midgett, A. (in press).  Ethnic differences in drinking motives and alcohol use among collegiate athletes. Journal of College Counseling.

 Abstract:  This study examined drinking motives, alcohol use, and alcohol-related problems among White collegiate athletes and collegiate athletes of color (N = 115).  Results indicated no differences in drinking motives between the two groups.  Although White athletes reported higher levels of alcohol use, athletes of color reported higher levels of alcohol-related problems.  Athletes of color with high levels of coping and conformity motives reported the highest level of alcohol-related problems.


Doumas, D. M., Nelson, K., DeYoung, A., & Conrad, C. (2014). Alcohol-related consequences among first year students: Effectiveness of a web-based personalized feedback program. Journal of College Counseling.

 Abstract:  This study evaluated the effectiveness of a web-based personalized feedback program using an objective measure of alcohol-related consequences.  Participants were assigned to either the intervention or an assessment-only control group during university orientation.  Sanctions received for campus alcohol policy violations were tracked over the academic year.  Results indicated high-risk drinkers in the control group received significantly more sanctions than other students.  Results support the effectiveness of web-based interventions.


Doumas, D. M., Turrisi, R., Ray, A. E., Esp, S. M., & Curtis-Schaeffer, A. K. (2013). A randomized trial evaluating a parent based intervention to reduce drinking. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 45, 31-37.

Abstract:  This study evaluated the effectiveness of a parent based intervention (PBI) in reducing drinking among first year college students (N = 443).  Students were assigned to one of three conditions: PBI, PBI plus booster brochures (PBI-B), and an assessment only control group (CNT). At a 4-month post-intervention follow-up, results indicated students in the PBI-B group reported significantly less drinking to intoxication and peak drinking relative to the PBI group and CNT group. No significant differences were found between the PBI group and CNT group.  Results provide further support for PBIs to reduce college student drinking and suggest that a booster brochure increases the effectiveness of PBIs.


Doumas, D. M. (2013). Alcohol-related consequences among intercollegiate student athletes: The role of drinking motives. Journal of Addiction and Offender Counseling, 34(1),51- 64.

Abstract:  This study examined drinking motives as predictors of alcohol-related consequences among student athletes and non-athletes.  Results indicated the highest level of alcohol-related consequences was reported by student athletes with high levels of both coping and conformity motives.


Doumas, D. M. (2012). Daytime predictors of evening alcohol use: Treatment implications for moderate to heavy drinkers. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 30(1), 78-90.

Abstract:  This study examined daytime mood, stress, and drinking-related consequences as predictors of evening alcohol use.  Twenty-four moderate to heavy drinkers completed diaries twice daily for 28 days.  Results of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses indicated daytime negative mood states predicted higher levels of evening alcohol use, whereas negative drinking-related consequences predicted lower levels of subsequent alcohol use.  Clinical implications include emphasizing negative drinking-related consequences in enhancing client motivation to change.  Results also support routine assessment of anxiety and depressed mood to help clinicians identify risk factors for drinking and provide intervention strategies targeting negative mood states to improve treatment outcomes.


Doumas, D. M., Workman, C. R., Navarro, A., & Smith, D. (2011). Evaluation of web-based and counselor delivered feedback interventions for mandated college students. Journal of Addiction and Offender Counseling, 32, 16-28.

Abstract:  This study evaluated the efficacy of two brief personalized feedback interventions aimed at reducing drinking among mandated college students.  Results indicated significant reductions in drinking for students in both conditions. Findings provide support for web-based interventions for mandated college students.


 Doumas, D. M., Kane, C. M., Navarro, T., & Roman, J. (2011). Decreasing heavy drinking in first year students: Evaluation of a web-based personalized feedback program administered during orientation. Journal of College Counseling, 14(1), 5-20.

Abstract:  This study evaluated the effectiveness of a web-based personalized feedback program, “electronic Check-Up to Go” (e-CHUG), in decreasing heavy drinking among first year students. Results indicated high-risk students receiving the e-CHUG program during first year orientation activities reported significantly greater reductions in heavy drinking and alcohol-related consequences than students in a control group at a 3 month follow-up. Recommendations for integrating e-CHUG into orientation activities are discussed.


Doumas, D. M., Workman, C. R., Smith, D., & Navarro, A. (2011). Reducing high-risk drinking in mandated college students: Evaluation of two personalized normative feedback interventions. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 40(4), 376-385.

Abstract:  This study evaluated the efficacy of two brief personalized normative feedback interventions aimed at reducing heavy drinking among mandated college students (N = 135).  Students were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: web-based assessment with self-guided personalized normative feedback (SWF) or web-based assessment with counselor-guided personalized normative feedback (CWF).  Results indicated students in the CWF condition reported significantly greater reductions in weekly drinking quantity and binge drinking frequency than those in the SWF group at follow-up (M = 8 months). Students in the CWF group also reported significantly greater reductions in estimates of peer drinking from baseline to the follow-up assessment than students in the SWF group. Additionally, changes in estimates of peer drinking partially mediated the effect of the intervention on changes in drinking. Results suggest that counselor-guided feedback may be more effective in reducing drinking among mandated students relative to self-guided feedback in the long-term.


Doumas, D. M., Haustveit, T., & Coll, K. M. (2010). Reducing heavy drinking in first year intercollegiate athletes: A randomized controlled trial of web-based normative feedback. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology. 22(3), 247-261.

 Abstract:  This study evaluated the efficacy of a web-based personalized normative feedback program targeting heavy drinking in first-year intercollegiate athletes. The program was offered through the Athletic Department first-year seminar at a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I university. Athletes were randomly assigned to either a web-based feedback group or a comparison condition. Results indicated high-risk athletes receiving the intervention reported significantly greater reductions in heavy drinking than those in the comparison group. Additionally, intervention effects were mediated by changes in perceptions of peer drinking. Findings support the use of web-based normative feedback for reducing heavy drinking in first-year intercollegiate athletes.