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Podcasting a powerful teaching assistant

Podcasts by the College of Education’s faculty members are examples of the innovative spirit at Boise State University.

Because of gadgets such as iPods and smartphones, many students today are used to learning by listening. For these students, the easiest way to deliver instruction to them is to place it on an everyday tool that they are familiar with using.

Podcasting can be a powerful teaching assistant. As a student:

  • You can listen when and where you want, at your own pace.
  • You can listen as many times as you need to understand the content.
  • You can improve listening and writing skills.

Podcasts also can raise cultural awareness, provide engaging language learning and connect classrooms around the world. Here are the current podcast offerings from the college’s faculty members (click on the headline links to go to the podcasts and get more detailed information):

Get a Move On

Tyler Johnson, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, instructs future physical education teachers on how to help their students adopt movement playgrounds. Johnson discusses ideas for encouraging more people to move more often. Helping people develop movement playgrounds seems to hold more legitimate promise for getting and keeping people moving than telling people to exercise solely for health benefits.

STEM Pipeline: Inspiration to Occupation

Louis Nadelson, associate professor in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Foundational Studies (CIFS), discusses his model that defines STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education and looks at the range of methodologies for teaching STEM.

Spatial Reasoning and the Mathematical Mind

Jonathan Brendefur, professor in CIFS, explains that mathematics also is about spatial reasoning—the ability to visually manipulate stimuli, to break apart and put together 2-D and 3-D shapes, to take these ideas and twist and turn them or to not be confused when an object’s orientation changes. This ability is one of the best predictors of later success in mathematics, and can be learned through a variety of different methods and practices.

Understanding Learning Disabilities

Evelyn Johnson is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education and Early Childhood Studies and executive director of Lee Pesky Learning Center. In her podcast, Johnson discusses learning disabilities, the challenges in diagnosis, and effective intervention strategies.

 

 

Headline: Podcasting a powerful teaching assistant

Podcasts by the College of Education’s faculty members are examples of the innovative spirit at Boise State University.

Because of gadgets such as iPods and smartphones, many students today are used to learning by listening. For these students, the easiest way to deliver instruction to them is to place it on an everyday tool that they are familiar with using.

Podcasting can be a powerful teaching assistant. As a student:

  • You can listen when and where you want, at your own pace.
  • You can listen as many times as you need to understand the content.
  • You can improve listening and writing skills.

Podcasts also can raise cultural awareness, provide engaging language learning and connect classrooms around the world. Here are the current podcast offerings from the college’s faculty members (click on the headline links to go to the podcasts and get more detailed information):

Get a Move On

Tyler Johnson, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, instructs future physical education teachers on how to help their students adopt movement playgrounds. Johnson discusses ideas for encouraging more people to move more often. Helping people develop movement playgrounds seems to hold more legitimate promise for getting and keeping people moving than telling people to exercise solely for health benefits.

STEM Pipeline: Inspiration to Occupation

Louis Nadelson, associate professor in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Foundational Studies (CIFS), discusses his model that defines STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education and looks at the range of methodologies for teaching STEM.

Spatial Reasoning and the Mathematical Mind

Jonathan Brendefur, professor in CIFS, explains that mathematics also is about spatial reasoning—the ability to visually manipulate stimuli, to break apart and put together 2-D and 3-D shapes, to take these ideas and twist and turn them or to not be confused when an object’s orientation changes. This ability is one of the best predictors of later success in mathematics, and can be learned through a variety of different methods and practices.

Understanding Learning Disabilities

Headline: Podcasting a powerful teaching assistant

Podcasts by the College of Education’s faculty members are examples of the innovative spirit at Boise State University.

Because of gadgets such as iPods and smartphones, many students today are used to learning by listening. For these students, the easiest way to deliver instruction to them is to place it on an everyday tool that they are familiar with using.

Podcasting can be a powerful teaching assistant. As a student:

• You can listen when and where you want, at your own pace.

• You can listen as many times as you need to understand the content.

• You can improve listening and writing skills.

Podcasts also can raise cultural awareness, provide engaging language learning and connect classrooms around the world. Here are the current podcast offerings from the college’s faculty members (click on the headline links to go to the podcasts and get more detailed information):

Get a Move On

Tyler Johnson, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology, instructs future physical education teachers on how to help their students adopt movement playgrounds. Johnson discusses ideas for encouraging more people to move more often. Helping people develop movement playgrounds seems to hold more legitimate promise for getting and keeping people moving than telling people to exercise solely for health benefits.

STEM Pipeline: Inspiration to Occupation

Louis Nadelson, associate professor in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Foundational Studies (CIFS), discusses his model that defines STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education and looks at the range of methodologies for teaching STEM.

Spatial Reasoning and the Mathematical Mind

Jonathan Brendefur, professor in CIFS, explains that mathematics also is about spatial reasoning—the ability to visually manipulate stimuli, to break apart and put together 2-D and 3-D shapes, to take these ideas and twist and turn them or to not be confused when an object’s orientation changes. This ability is one of the best predictors of later success in mathematics, and can be learned through a variety of different methods and practices.

Understanding Learning Disabilities

Evelyn Johnson is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education and Early Childhood Studies and executive director of Lee Pesky Learning Center. In her podcast, Johnson discusses learning disabilities, the challenges in diagnosis, and effective intervention strategies.

 

Evelyn Johnson is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education and Early Childhood Studies and executive director of Lee Pesky Learning Center. In her podcast, Johnson discusses learning disabilities, the challenges in diagnosis, and effective intervention strategies.

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